Book Review: Where Rainbows End by Cecelia Ahern

If you haven’t heard the saying “there’s gold at the end of the rainbow” then it might help make sense of the title “Where Rainbows End” by Cecelia Ahern.

Probably as is likely true for most North Americans, I heard about Cecelia Ahern from the movie “P.S. I love you”, which now holds a spot in the top two of my favorite chick flicks. I like to read books and then watch the movie, but I haven’t done the reverse – watch the movie and then buy the book. Although I have considered it, I bought “Where Rainbows End” instead because I didn’t know the story already and I didn’t want to know what happens when reading my first Ahern novel.

Being female, I should like pink and be drawn to the very chick-litty looking book covers, but for some reason the pink and purple and the title including the word “rainbow” did make me hesitate in buying the book. I like women’s fiction and I read a lot of it as you can see from the Book Reviews page on this blog, but its usually a little too sugary for my taste.

Ceclia Ahern’s “Where Rainbows End” is a story of love and friendship. Alex and Rosie grow up as childhood friends in Dublin (Ireland), but when Alex’s father lands a job in Boston (US) they are separated. Rosie plans to finally join Alex when she is accepted into a Hotel Mangement degree in Boston, but it seems that fate is always getting in the way. The story follows the separate lives of Alex and Rosie and how they always seem to keep a close connection even though they are thousands of miles apart. The question is: will they finally get together or will they always remain just friends?

Ahern wrote this book entirely through letters, emails, instant messages and postcards. It was an interesting way to read a book because so much of human communication these days is through these mediums rather than face to face. This method of writing is also advantageous because there are no bridges (or sequals) needed between each scene which are in this book presented through emails, ect.

Ahern can go from message to message and give one sentence about what happened in the meantime and so there is rarely a dull moment. The story if full of twists of fate and sometimes you just wish Rosie could catch a break. Its a great story that will have you thinking “Nooo!” and “Whyyyy!” and “Not again!” I think a little bit more context/background would have done wonders, but I can see that it would be hard to work in character apparence, location and age into each message. Reading this book, you give up the luxary of knowing everything about the characters and their lives, but you do get real and very personal revelations. Its a different way to read a story, either you’ll love it or really dislike it. For me, I don’t know what it was, but I read this book much faster than I’ve ever read a book before. I usually like to take it slow to really enjoy it rather than race through. It may have been the format which facilitated the ease of reading.

The title “Where Rainbows End” does loosely fit with the story. I make the connection with the saying that “there is gold at the end of the rainbow” which legend may have it might be an Irish saying? I think perhaps a different title would win Ahern more readers beacuse the titles and covers make you automatically think that its nothing but sugar, but upon my first reading, her book has just the right amount of sweetness.

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About Nicole Basaraba

Nicole Basaraba is a Canadian writer focusing on topics of travel (Mondays), writing and literature (Wednesdays), lifestyle (Fridays) and her experiences living in the capital city of Europe: Brussels, Belgium.
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7 Responses to Book Review: Where Rainbows End by Cecelia Ahern

  1. Ann says:

    Thanks for the great review. I read The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society and enjoyed that – it was written entirely from letters.
    Ann

  2. Ellie says:

    This is one of those books that I am waiting to work its way to me (once again i am reminded or the irony that i wam a ‘wannabe writer’ that doesn’t buy books – i think thi smay come back to bite me on the bum!)

    I read PS I Love You long before the film was made, and loved it! The film disappointed me but I think that will always be the case. When I saw Ahern interviewed for this book I was so intrigued, and it has stayed with me. Glad you enjoyed it – i actually feel quite excited at the prospect of reading this (hopefully very soon!)

  3. Nicole, I also cringe at the “pink and glitter” book covers (although I love pink clothes, purses etc.). But I might give this one a try :-) Thank you for sharing such a wonderful book review!

  4. Pingback: Writers’ Uni-Verse-City – A semester in review | Nicole Basaraba's Uni-Verse-City

  5. Dawn Eddy says:

    I really like your review, I read this book on my return flight from Dublin to Toronto last August and agree with you that it was a fast read, the fastest I have ever read. I really enjoyed this book so much I mailed it to my close friend to enjoy in England. Great reading your reivew and look forward to reading more, Thanks

  6. Zoey says:

    I actually enjoy Cecelia Ahern’s books’ covers:)
    What I like most is that they have a sparkle of romance and a sparkle of magic and I think that’s what makes her books so special.
    I read WHERE RAINBOWS END some years ago and I loved it- I still do.
    Your review was real good and I’m always happy with people writing reviews in such a great way.
    The only negative thing about the book is, in my opinion, that the emails and letters from Alex and Rosie’s childhood days are far too little and I’d be comletely satisfied if there were, let’s say, 20 additional pages written from their perspective as teenagers. I think that’d be great.
    Nevertheless: thanks for your nice review:)

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